Posted by: kklist | March 27, 2018

Eric Bosco Story for April 12

Hiya Ethics,

I included a link to Eric’s Globe story in your calendar, but I realized you’ll hit a paywall if you’re not a Globe subscriber, so here is a PDF of the story. 

See you Thursday in the Hub for Mike Hengel’s talk. I’ve been bragging about what a great Ethics class you are. Please prove me right by answering his questions and asking your own. Be sure to leave your questions with me at the end of the talk so I know you were there.

See you Thursday!

best,

k

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Posted by: kklist | March 27, 2018

Ethics Calendar through April 12

Hiya Ethics,

Please click here to download a calendar that details readings/assignments in Ethics from this Tuesday through April 12th. This will go on our WordPress page, and I’ll bring hard copies to class tomorrow.

Amazingly, we’re right on schedule!

best,

k

Posted by: kklist | March 23, 2018

Next Week in Ethics!

Hiya Ethics,

We’ll explore Conflict of Interest next week.

Tuesday: We’ll watch a short video on the massive conflict of interest that can be created for journalists by media owners. Then we’ll discuss the Conflict of Interest readings and do some in-class work.

Thursday: Mike Hengel will speak to us in the Journalism Hub. Mike was Las Vegas Review-Journal editor in 2015 when the paper was sold by Gatehouse to a shell corporation. The newsroom was told: “Don’t worry about who owns the paper. Focus on your jobs.”

Mike assigned his best reporters to figure out the identity of the new owner. When they learned it was casino magnate Sheldon Adelson, he made the “career-ending decision” to publish the story. He then told a “stunned” newsroom he was leaving after more than 39 years in journalism. A reporter tweeted: “@mhengel leaves with his head high and a newsroom of reporters who would walk through fire for him. A dying breed.”

Caeli Chesin (’19) interviewed Mike for her final Ethics project last semester, and she’ll introduce him. He’ll talk about the ethical issues he and his reporters encountered and how they worked through them.

Please answer the questions Mike poses and ask lots of your own questions about anything related to journalism ethics. Bring three typed questions for Mike with you and turn them into me before you leave the Hub.

Have a great weekend!

best,

k

Posted by: kklist | March 22, 2018

Next Ethics Assignment

Hiya Ethics,

Here is a copy of your Accuracy/Fairness/Sources assignment, with links to all the readings, and the Reckless Disregard handout.

We’ll talk about the assignment again on Thursday, so you can ask any questions you might have.

See you then!

best,

k

Posted by: kklist | March 12, 2018

Wait! Don’t Go Yet!

Hiya Ethics,

New York Times tech writer Farhad Manjoo has been slow-jamming his news for two months—reading three print newspapers and a magazine that focus on accuracy and depth instead of social media that focus on speed. It seems to have changed his life for the better. His three rules: “Get news. Not too quickly. Avoid social.”

This was the surprise blessing of the newspaper. I was getting news a day old, but in the delay between when the news happened and when it showed up on my front door, hundreds of experienced professionals had done the hard work for me.

Now I was left with the simple, disconnected and ritualistic experience of reading the news, mostly free from the cognitive load of wondering whether the thing I was reading was possibly a blatant lie.

He says you can accomplish the same thing by looking at a news app once a day, reading morning newsletters or listening to a daily news podcast.

Check it out before you start your break!

best,

k

Posted by: kklist | March 12, 2018

Overlooked

Hiya Ethics,

Here is the Times new feature, Overlooked, which seeks to redress the lack of obituaries of women in the Times since its founding in 1851. Even in the past two years, only one in five obits have been those of women.

This feature will be expanded each week. Note that the first woman included is Ida B. Wells, a muckraking reporter who covered lynching at the turn of the 20th century when few others were. She was a Journalist/Activist in the best sense of the word.

“It is with no pleasure that I have dipped my hands in the corruption here exposed,” Wells wrote in 1892 in the introduction to “Southern Horrors,” one of her seminal works about lynching, “Somebody must show that the Afro-American race is more sinned against than sinning, and it seems to have fallen upon me to do so.”

For Tuesday, March 20th, please read all of the articles under Sources. We’ll focus on that topic all week, and you’ll get your next big assignment on Fairness/Sources.

In the meantime, have a great spring break!

All best,

k

Posted by: kklist | March 7, 2018

Rape Coverage on Thursday

Hiya Ethics,

In Thursday’s class, we’ll discuss the ethics of rape coverage. Be sure to read the last two articles in the Fairness section–the CJR piece on reporting sexual assault and the Poynter piece on New York Magazine’s groundbreaking 2015 cover story on Bill Cosby’s accusers. Be sure to click on the links to see the many multimedia aspects of the coverage. This was courageous work, several years before the #MeToo movement.

And the second Cosby trial (after the first resulted in a hung jury) is about to begin in PA. Check this in today’s Times: “Cosby Lawyers: #MeToo Moment Makes a Fair Trial Difficult.”

NORRISTOWN, Pa. — The #MeToo movement is making it tougher for Bill Cosby to get a fair trial, his lawyers asserted Tuesday, as they fought in a pretrial hearing here to prevent 19 additional accusers from testifying at his retrial on sexual assault charges.

Prosecutors say the 19 accounts would establish a pattern of predatory conduct by Mr. Cosby, 80, and help fend off defense attacks on the credibility of Andrea Constand, whose accusation that Mr. Cosby drugged and assaulted her in 2004 is the only one to lead to criminal charges. Mr. Cosby has said that the episode, which occurred at his home near here, was consensual.

We’ll watch the weather, but I’m planning on seeing you in class tomorrow. In the meantime, enjoy your snow day!

best,

k

Posted by: kklist | March 6, 2018

What’s up with Nunberg’s Interviews?

Hiya Ethics,

We didn’t have time to discuss yesterday’s Sam Nunberg interviews, but it’s worth a quick look at this from the Washington Post Most: “What on earth was Sam Nunberg doing? A few theories.”

We know that it’s ethically wrong to interview someone who’s drunk or under the influence of drugs, but no one seems to know what the situation was with Nunberg, a former Trump aide, who who had just been subpoenaed by Robert Mueller in the Russia investigation and who seemed to unravel on air as the day went on.

You can watch some of the video here too.

See you Thursday to talk about fairness in rape coverage.

best,

k

Posted by: kklist | March 5, 2018

Journalists? Activists? Find Out Tuesday!

Hiya Ethics,

In Tuesday’s class, we’ll continue our discussion of Fairness, trying to determine if we’re journalists, activists or both. Be sure you’ve read the Maria Sacchetti story on ICE that I distributed in class.

And we’ll be talking about Diversity soon, so take a quick look at this Margaret Sullivan piece in today’s Post: “Don’t forget how the movement that changed Hollywood started: With great reporting”:

The world has changed since last year’s Oscars — and for the better.

So let’s not forget what got us there: great journalism.

Legacy media companies may be under constant criticism, and trust in the press may be at a low point.

But less than six months after the New York Times broke its first story about abusive film mogul Harvey Weinstein in early October — quickly followed by more revelations from the New Yorker magazine — American culture has been flipped on its head.

Nothing is the same: Not awards shows, not the corporate workplace, not national politics.

See you Tuesday!

best,

k

Posted by: kklist | March 1, 2018

Facebook Disappoints Again?

Good Morning, Ethics,

Columbia Journalism Review today talks about another (meagre) Facebook effort to shore up the news business. The $3 million pilot project to help media boost subscriptions—described by one critic as a “pretty savvy move by Facebook to make it look like it cares about local reporting”—amounts to 0.007 percent of Facebook’s 2017 revenues.

As Facebook continues to take fire for leaving the media industry twisting in the wind with its new algorithm changes, not to mention distributing fake news and disinformation, . . . conspicuously absent [from the new proposal], not surprisingly, was any mention of the main reason why newspapers and other media entities are being forced to rely on subscription revenue—namely, that Facebook and Google have vacuumed up the vast majority of digital advertising over the past few years, leaving much of the media industry with nothing but a giant, smoking crater where its ad revenue used to be.

Glad to see that Facebook is taking my advice to provide some financial support to local journalism! 🙂

See you Thursday to continue our discussion of Fairness.

best,

k

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